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how_to_clone_tru64_and_digital_unix [2018/12/11 16:05]
sgriggs
how_to_clone_tru64_and_digital_unix [2018/12/11 17:02] (current)
sgriggs [Fix the Sysconfigtab]
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 Another file you //might// have to alter is your **/​etc/​sysconfigtab**. This isn't always needed. I believe it's a difference between Tru64 and Digital Unix. There are some versions of startup scripts which will refer to the file again, for a swap device. It would be present in the section called **vm:**. If you see a swap device listed in that section, alter it to point to the new disk or remove it.  Another file you //might// have to alter is your **/​etc/​sysconfigtab**. This isn't always needed. I believe it's a difference between Tru64 and Digital Unix. There are some versions of startup scripts which will refer to the file again, for a swap device. It would be present in the section called **vm:**. If you see a swap device listed in that section, alter it to point to the new disk or remove it. 
 +
 +
 +=== Final Steps ===
 +
 +Insure that you have completed these steps.
 +
 +  - Install the boot loader using disk label
 +  - Edit the disklabel on your target disk
 +  - Re-create UFS or AdvFS file systems
 +  - Copy files over from the original
 +  - Fix the **/​etc/​rc.config**,​ **/​etc/​sysconfigtab**,​ and of course, the **/​etc/​fstab**
 +
 +You should have done all these steps before you attempt the new disk. 
 +
 +==== Final Boot ====
 +
 +Now the system is ready to reboot. You probably want to understand a bit of interaction with what we call the SRM console. The main thing you want to do is to check the values of the following.
 +
 +  - **show dev** This will show you all the devices (NICs, HBAs, and of course disks). You need to know which disk is your target versus destination disk. The device list should have clues like the manufacturer name and the device model.
 +  - The **boot** command takes the disk name as an argument. For example: "boot dka0" or "boot dqa0" would boot each of those disks respectively. Also, if you'd like to try single user mode you'll want to use the "-fl s" argument to boot into single user mode (if you do then remember to use **bcheckrc** command to make single user mode usable). ​
 +  - The **show** command is the compliment of the **set** command. These allow you to view and alter the names of SRM variables which alter boot and system behavior.
 +  - Understand the variables that matter most like **BOOTDEF_DEV** which points to the default boot device on the system. Another you might want to understand is **AUTO_ACTION** which governs if the system will automatically try to boot up the system or halts at the SRM chevron prompt. The action names are **boot** or **halt**. ​
 +
 +So, what do you normally need to do? Try to boot the clone but don't yet change the default boot device until you are ready to completely switch over to the clone.  ​
 +
 +==== Troubleshooting ​ ====
 +
 +Cloning was something that DEC intended folks to use **sysman** for. Unfortunately,​ their process is too inflexible for most use. So, this more manual method is needed. It is, unfortunately a fault prone process. Here are some of the normal issues.
 +
 +===== The Drive will not Boot =====
 +
 +If you issue the **boot** command from the SRM console but you never see the kernel line saying "UNIX Boot" then you probably had an issue with the boot sector. Do the following. ​
 +
 +  - Re-mount the target disk and make double sure that you have the kernel on the root file system. These would be in the form of two files named **vmunix** and **genvmunix**. Without a kernel, you can't boot the system. They should be there as a result of your file copy effort.
 +  - Unfortunately,​ the most likely cause is that you didn't do the disklabel steps in the proper order. Zero the disklabel with the **-z** and start over. Do it in the proper order and you'll have better luck. 
 +
 +===== It Hangs During Boot =====
 +
 +Depends on why and where it hangs. The most common issues are these. ​
 +
 +  - You forgot to edit out some kind of reference to the swap device. Check the post-copy steps again. One of the startup scripts probably tried to activate swap on a device that won'​t. ​
 +  - You are using UFS and you forgot to fix the reference to the **/​etc/​fstab** for one of the file systems. You might also have to edit any reference for swap, especially on Digital Unix 4.x. Also pay attention for any other filesystems that might have changed or gone away. 
 +  - Make sure your copy method preserved all the permissions,​ especially on **/sbin** and the scripts in **/​sbin/​init.d** which are critical. ​
 +  - Do NOT try to eliminate one of the AdvFS file domains. As mentioned earlier, the startup scripts reference both **root_domain** and **usr_domain** and if you change their names or eliminate one of them the startup scripts will fail. 
 +
 +If you have problems beyond the ones documented, then consider contacting PARSEC for some consulting work to help you!
 +
 +
  
  
how_to_clone_tru64_and_digital_unix.txt ยท Last modified: 2018/12/11 17:02 by sgriggs